Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Clarification of military opt-out

Several people mis-understood my previous post so I am going to clarify it and add to it.

My previous post talks about how scary to me it is that about 2/3 of the total kids who opted-out of being "recruited" in Allen County are from Homestead high school.

The point of the post was not about the opt-out program; it was supposed to be about how strange it is that 2/3 of the kids who opted-out attend Homestead high school.

Many of you thought I was against the opt-out procedure. I will clarify my position on that. One of the worst laws passed in recent years is "The No Child Left Behind Act." I have posted a lot about this "Act" and how I am against the Federal government getting more involved in education... One of the provisions of that "Act" was the opt-out procedure.

I am not against the opt-out procedure. Choice is good. I do not see anything wrong with being taken off the "recruiters list" so that the military is not contacting people who are not interested in the military.

I am not sure who I think should be the ones to determine if the student should opt-out. Should it be the parent or the student? In my opinion I think the form should have to be signed by BOTH the parent AND the student.

The area served by Homestead high school has the families with the highest median income in Allen County. That area is considered very Republican according to the Allen County voter database. Most of the student population opted-out.

The area served by Carroll high school serves the families with the next highest median income in Allen County. That area is considered very Republican according to the Allen County voter database. About 3% of the student population opted-out.

I find the above two paragraphs amazing.

How about you?

Mike Sylvester

4 comments:

Jeff Pruitt said...

Interesting to say the least and I'm not sure what to attribute it to. Perhaps Homestead publicizes the opt-out option more than Carroll or any other school?

Or it could be something as simple as letting kids out of class for 10min to sign the opt-out form. You'd be surprised how many students would sign for anything if it meant they could get out of class for a few minutes...

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Tim Zank said...

Mike, odds are pretty good because the opt-out form was put in the registration packet more were signed. When sent out separately they have to be mailed back or sent back with the student after school has been in session for a while...speaking as the parent of a teenager, getting forms back to school after the first go around with the big packet is easier said than done...

Most parents (like me) sit down and go through the registration one time, sign it all, write a check and send it back....stuff that shows up later that isn't required for classes or sports usually falls by the wayside...

Robert Enders said...

I wouldn't read too much into it. A young man who is absolutely sure he is going to join the Army after graduation might opt out so that he doesn't get junk mail from the Navy and Air Force. A pacifist might decide to not opt out so that the military wastes time, money, and other resources in futile efforts to get that person to join.

I had considered joining the military while I was in high school. Mom told me to try college first. Nevertheless, even as I was considering it, I would have still opted out. Ultimately, the decision would have been mine and mine alone.