Wednesday, September 20, 2006

NACS Administrator Wages

Check this out:

<http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/news/15554377.htm>

Wow...

Mike Sylvester

6 comments:

Tim Zank said...

And they say education doesn't pay?

Anonymous said...

THEY get raises? For what?

I thought our governor was cutting down on administrator spending and bureaucracy. These idiots do more damage than good. Oh well, I'll be graduating soon! Go Blue!

Tim Zank said...

Seriously, I have no problem with educators and administrators being paid well. I come from a huge family of teachers and my oldest son graduates next spring with a bachelors in Elementary Education.

What I do have a problem with is somebody knockin' down close to 6 figures from taxpayer dollars and NOT being held accountable. Most administrators have an insular position and seem rarely held accountable.

Bartleby said...

Here's the thing. There's a market out there for government-school administrators. If you're going to run a school system, according to the standard government-school model, then you have a choice to make. You find that, if you don't pay the going salary to these folks, you'll know it by seeing an exodus ... if there's better pay available elsewhere, they'll move to get it, if they're at all competent.

The Indiana School Boards Association maintains a statistical database of adminstrator pay, whereby you can (if you're interested) compare what you pay administrators to what comparable systems pay comparable people.

Another yardstick: are the (qualified) teachers in your schools knocking down the doors to get building principalships, when they come open? I'm not talking about your clowns and misfits here; I'm talking about presentable, able people who won't be constantly embarrassing you. It's a market thing: if everybody wants to be a principal, then you're paying principals better than you really need to. I'm guessing that not everybody is trying to be a principal.

Of course, my comments apply to the government-school model. Which speaks to why I'm not on a school board any more. To really make significant change, you have to infest offices that are up a level or two.

William Larsen said...

What is the turn over rate in teachers and principals here in NACS? From what I see it is very low. This means we may be overpaying our faculty.

I know what I am about to say will ruffle a few feathers, but here it goes.

A teacher is a professional and like any professional, few get paid over time. Take engineers who travel for a few weeks a year, work late hours and weekends. They are not the only ones either. There are many professions who work many hours above and beyond 40 per week and not get paid for them.

A teacher workers 181 days a year. They have very good pension benefits; 401B which is far better than any 401K; above average healthcare benefits in terms of cost; have summers off, holidays off and for the most part their schedule matches school age children the best of any occupation which can save on other costs.

The bottom line is if you take the standard 7 hour school day and multiply by 181 hours you get 1,267 hours a year. The standard 40 hour work year is 2080 hours. They basically work 61% of the standard year. Even when you subtract out holiday’s 80 hours and vacation 80 hours you still have 66% of what other professional occupations work.

A teacher making $36,000 a year is pulling down a prorated salary of $54,554 a year plus better benefits.

Many say teachers take work home. Well so do other professional occupations. It is the nature of the beast.

With jobs moving out of the area, it may be that teachers have the only safe occupation left and that in and of it self means maybe, just maybe they are being paid too much.

Tim Zank said...

Oh William, that'll make you a favorite with teachers unions!!