Friday, November 06, 2009

Split Pea Soup: Examples of Entrepreneurial Spirit abounds at the Pontiac Mall this holiday season.

As most of my really close friends are aware I am in the process of moving from the north end of the City by Glenbrook Mall to the southwest side of town. Between the adventure of getting the house ready to move into (putting visquinne on the windows, getting utilities turned on), meeting my crazy neighbors, and getting to know the neighborhood I will now reside in, I found something really cool to tell you all about.

Three days ago I found myself in the throws of my stomach revolting against the idea of going another a hour without food, it was really warm that day so I had burned through my breakfast relatively quickly with everything going on, plus being hypoglycemic trying to stave off a protein deficiency and a sugar crash at the same time means only one option, milk product (milk has equal parts, protein and sugar, instant fix) and rest then food; cigarettes and nicotine and string cheese can only get you so far. So I went looking for a diner or cafe; I knew there had to be one somewhere. Somewhere down Pontiac Street there had to be a classic hole in the wall diner, some place with inexpensive, good quality, old soul style, food, (or as we use to call it, grubbins); the free market, my wallet, demanded nothing else. I wondered aimlessly across Pontiac looking for said restaurant, I wanted a real restaurant something with character and community fried into its pores.

After turning around one time to check back at the Pontiac Mall I happened across a sign at the very bottom that I didnt see the first time I passed thanks to a light pole and a bus blocking the sign from view at 30 mph. I park and walk in only to find a sign that said the cafe was only open from 11a-1p. Completely disheartened and my blood sugar levels close to crashing, I went into the convience store to grab a soda as a last ditch effort to give me a quick boost until I could find dinner, only to find out that the restaurant is open and the entrance is on the west-south-west (right of the main entrance) side of the building. I will be okay, yeah!

I went in and standing behind the service window of Mattie Mae's Cafe is a short and stocky middle age woman with a cheerful grin and a mild roar greeting me saying "how is you doing?" and "what will you have?" her name is Marnetta. Marnetta named the Cafe after her Aunt, there are several pictures of her in the Cafe. I would recommend that you try the signature Mattie Burger Combo which consist of a seasoned 1/4 lbs (after cooking) of meat cheese and the works including mayo, with a side of seasoned fries, and a can of Big K Soda (additional sodas are by the can at 50 cents each) for about 5.00. The other menu I can recommend is the Nachos both of these will fill anyone up easily. Mattie Mae's is open Tuesday through Saturday from 8a-7p and is located at the Pontiac Mall 1108 East Pontiac across from the Whitney Young Early Childhood Center.

The reason I am telling you all of this is because of what I found while I was there. At the service window on the counter they had a contest, for a dollar you got to guess how much candy was in this 2 pound container, if you won you got a free meal on the house. The donations from the game are going to put on a Thanksgiving dinner for the area homeless and hungry and the whole mall is participating and hosting the venture of service to those in need. So my request to each of you that read this blog is that if you like good food, and you want to spread the ideas of libertarian philosophy around, and support group of businesses that are reaching out to serve the community they are in, spend a dollar, take a guess, and then stay for dinner. At Mattie Mae's a family of four can still eat for less than a quarter of a buck (that is $25) in the Summit City and it doesnt have to be fast food.

Think about it and then do something about it!

1 comment:

Gloria said...

It doesn't surprise me that a small business ran a contest to raise money to buy a Thanksgiving dinner for those in need. The poor and middle class have a better sense of helping the less fortunate than Corporate America and the wealthy do, but it makes one wonder, if the haves would help the have nots, what a better place this world would be.